Membership Fee Waiver Program

Starting with the 2017 American Anthropological Association (AAA) conference in Washington DC, the Council on Anthropology and Education (CAE) is pleased to announce the Membership Fee Waiver Program for new members to CAE.  The one-time fee waiver will be for the CAE section fees only (i.e., $15 for students or $50 for standard membership).  The program applies to all eligible student or professional members.

To receive the membership fee waiver, eligible recipients must be either: 1) new members to the CAE, or 2) members who have let their membership lapse for more than 3 years (i.e., since 2014 or before). Recipients of the fee waiver must also complete the following requirements:

  • Apply for the waiver by sending the CAE Treasurer (Eric Johnson—see below) an email requesting a waiver code that will be used upon registration for the AAA conference and updating membership status.  The waiver code must be obtained prior to registration (i.e., any fees already paid will not be reimbursed).
  • Register for the AAA conference in Washington DC and use the waiver code for the CAE section membership fee.
  • Attend the AAA conference in Washington DC.
  • Participate in the new member orientation at the CAE Business Meeting event (scheduling information will be sent to all eligible recipients before the conference).

Although this waiver program is for CAE membership fees only, the AAA has a “New & Recent PhD Graduate Program” that provides a free 1 year membership to the AAA.  More information about that program can be found on the AAA website: www.americananthro.org/ConnectWithAAA/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=20990

Please feel free to contact the CAE Treasurer, Eric Johnson, if you have any questions:

[email protected]

CAE Board Statement : A Call to Action in this Political Moment

 

I.

In the wake of the US Presidential regime change, the Council on Anthropology and Education reaffirms our mission and its commitment to “advance anti-oppressive, socially equitable, and racially just outcomes . . . in all settings where learning takes place.”

II.

Living out this mission in the current political moment requires us to speak back to calls for academic neutrality, and instead to stand firmly against racist, anti-immigrant/refugee, Islamophobic, anti-Semitic, homophobic, transphobic, ableist, and misogynistic words, actions, and policies. Inequality and oppression are not new. As anthropologists of education we have long documented the effects of deeply entrenched systems of oppression and injustice across many communities and worked to challenge and change these conditions, both in the US and internationally. However, this election and new administration have enabled a surge in both the quantity and intensity of the hatred and oppressive policies directed at targeted communities. We cannot allow this reality to slide into normalization. Many people are living and will continue to live with a new level of fear of individual acts perpetrated against them and we must continue to work with communities to address these acts. At the same time, we must focus energy on speaking against the policies of this new administration that have already and will continue to harm many individuals, communities, and nations. These policies include, for example, increased surveillance, denial of human and civil rights, abrogation of the rights of indigenous communities, environmental devastation, dismantling of our public education system, intensified militarization of the police, even wider deportation of immigrants, denial of the rights of refugees to safe haven, and increased international conflict. In this context it is more important than ever to affirm that there is no room for compromise in our fundamental valuing of all humans, and their right to live and learn free from violence, hatred, and oppression in the US and also abroad. Within this fragile moment, we, as anthropologists of education, bear the responsibility to continue to write and work  “against the grain” of these dominating logics. Indeed, ethnographies, with their emphasis on lived experience, are critical tools we can continue to mobilize in order to interrupt white supremacy and other forms of oppression being concretized in our midst.  

III.

Our mission and our conscience call on us to work in solidarity, support, and stand with all communities whose safety, well-being, and dignity are threatened by both government policies that create oppressive conditions, and government inaction in the face of hatred directed at so many communities.

 

To that end, we plan to increase our efforts “to promote racial and social justice in all settings where learning takes place.” We will work with our members to:

 

  1. Continue to conduct research with and for communities to document and interrupt the effects of oppression in the lives of young people, their schools, and their communities, while also continuing to understand and promote social change and justice. Here we might be emboldened to continue our work of drafting  “ethnographies of resistance and hope” that can document and enact more expanded ways of being.
  2. Draw on our knowledge base as educational anthropologists to create, strengthen, and disseminate materials and resources with and for educators and community organizers that support them in their work for social justice in these times.
  3. Engage in public advocacy for anti-oppressive, equitable, and racially just policies.

 

We can only do this work in community with each other. We encourage CAE members to share their ideas for actions, reaffirm our mission, and join in solidarity with the many communities within which we work to create just, equitable, and compassionate spaces for living and learning together.

AEQ Call for Submissions

Call for Submissions
Anthropology & Education Quarterly
Educational Anthropologists Respond:
The 2016 Presidential Election & The New Administration

At the 2016 AAA Annual Meeting, educational anthropologists engaged in many conversations about the 2016 presidential election and the new political era ushered in by its outcome. In formal meeting spaces, informal conversations, and paper sessions that spontaneously transformed into impromptu discussions, we talked about the outcome of the election and its implications for the children, families, communities and schools we work with as educational anthropologists.

The purpose of this special issue is to continue these conversations, to deepen them, and engage with wider audiences—especially in light of the new administration’s actions in the first 100 days.

We invite scholarly, creative, and artistic works that respond to the question: What does the 2016 presidential election—and the new political era it has ushered in the United States, and around the globe—mean for the Council on Anthropology of Education (CAE) as a body, for the intellectual field of educational anthropology, and for scholars/activists/educators working with targeted populations? What are the implications of this moment, and how can we respond?

We invite submissions from a variety of genres, including (but not limited to):
• Creative nonfiction
• Op-ed style essays
• Poetry
• Visual art
• Black and white photography
• Testimonial
• Performance auto-ethnography
• Scholarly essays

Written submissions should be less than 5000 words—and shorter pieces are also acceptable. All submissions, including creative material, will be sent out for blind review.
Deadline: April 1, 2017
For more information, please contact [email protected]

Call for Submissions Anthropology & Education Quarterly

Special Issue: Educational Anthropologists Respond to 2016 Presidential Election

At the 2016 AAA Annual Meeting, educational anthropologists engaged in many conversations about the 2016 presidential election and the new political era ushered in by its outcome. In formal meeting spaces, informal conversations, and paper sessions that spontaneously transformed into impromptu discussions, we talked about the outcome of the election and its implications for the children, families, communities and schools we work with as educational anthropologists.

The purpose of this special issue is to continue these conversations, to deepen them, and engage with wider audiences. We invite scholarly, creative, and artistic works that respond to the question: What does the 2016 presidential election mean for the Council on Anthropology of Education (CAE) as a body, for the intellectual field of educational anthropology, and for scholars/activists/educators with expertise in this area? What are the implications of this moment, and how can we respond?

We invite submissions from a variety of genres, including (but not limited to):

Creative Non-Fiction
Op-Ed Style Essays
Poetry
Visual Art
Black and White Photography
Performance auto-ethnography
Scholarly Essays

Written submissions should be less than 2000 words. All submissions, including creative material, will be sent out for blind review.

Deadline: January 15, 2017.

To submit please go to: https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/aneq and create an account. Mark your submissions as “special issue” and include in your cover letter a reference to “Presidential election special issue”.

For more information, please contact [email protected]

Submitting to the Council of Anthropology and Education for the 2016 AAA Meetings

A NOTE FROM THE 2016 PROGRAM CHAIR

Greetings! I am reaching out on behalf of the Executive Committee to invite you to submit proposals for this year’s 115th AAA conference to be held in Minneapolis, Minnesota from November 16-20th 2016. Below you will find information regarding the conference theme, instructions on how to submit papers, panels, posters, and alternative possibilities for submission such as roundtables, public policy forums, and installations.  The theme of the conference for this year’s annual meeting is “Evidence, Accident, Discovery” (see below).  You may like to use the theme as an organizing principle if appropriate, however, proposals do not need to address the theme directly if it is not pertinent to the proposal submitted. Proposals to CAE are due April 15.

In case you missed these emails to the AAA list, note that AAA (not CAE) organizes a small number of Executive Committee Sessions each year. AAA has sent emails about that process. The deadline for proposing an executive session is noon February 17. Those proposals go directly to AAA.

CONFERENCE THEME: Evidence, Accident, Discovery
The 115th Annual Meeting theme, “Evidence, Accident, Discovery,” raises issues central to debates within both anthropology and politics in a neoliberal, climate-changing, social media-networked era: What counts as evidence? What does evidence count for? What are the underlying causes and foreseeability of violence and catastrophes? How is misfortune interpreted, and causality, attributed in cases of humanly-preventable harm? And in the give and take of relationships on which anthropological evidence typically depends, Who gets to claim that they discovered something? We welcome proposals that debate these and other questions stimulated by the conference theme, in the opportunity that our annual meeting provides for “big tent” debate.

REGISTRATION AND SUBMISSION DEADLINE

April 15th has become the annual deadline for all submissions, paper, panel, poster, retrospectives, reviews, roundtables, and installations. First, you must register for the conference (and typically renew membership) at the time of submitting your proposal, even though this does not guarantee that you will get on the program. (You WILL get a refund in the event that you are not accepted to the program.) Please note, however, that one does not need to be a member of CAE in order to submit to our section. Indeed, we hope that you will get colleagues involved who ordinarily might not participate in theCAE program. This goes for AAA members with primary affiliations to other sections, as well as non-AAA members, whom you can assist by applying for a membership waiver so they can participate without purchasing AAA membership (though they will still have to pay the non-member conference registration fee). You can find rules for participation at the following link: http://www.americananthro.org/AttendEvents/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=2017

Submissions for the April 15 deadline can take multiple forms. You can submit an individual paper, or as a member of a paper session, which is a cluster of papers organized around a particular theme, or as a part of some other collective format. Look on the AAA website to see all the possible formats for sessions and papers:

http://www.americananthro.org/AttendEvents/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=2040

SUBMITTING WITHIN COMMITTEES

We highly recommend that you explore the CAE standing committee structure and connect with like-minded folks who are putting together panels or other events (There are currently 15 thematic committees). That said we also want to make it clear that committee involvement is not a prerequisite to proposing a session; it is simply a way of trying to bring people together with common interests. And if you don’t manage to connect with a group compiling a panel, you can still submit an individually volunteered paper, and have it considered for inclusion in the program. If you submit an individual paper to CAE, the program committee will attempt to group papers into panels that cohere around a particular methodological, theoretical, geographical, or conceptual theme.
INVITED SESSIONS VS. VOLUNTEER SESSION SUBMISSIONS

There are no longer early submission dates for invited sessions. Instead, everyone will submit by April 15th. CAE is typically allowed 2-3 invited sessions, depending on whether we are able to arrange co-sponsorships with other sections. Submissions will be reviewed and ranked following the April 15deadline. The review rankings of the submissions will guide the CAE Executive Board to make a decision about which sessions will receive an invited Status. Invited sessions are supposed to be “innovative, synthesizing sessions intended to reflect the state-of-the-art and the thematic concerns in the major subfields.” A volunteered session is a general category. A session that receives an invited status will be provided with a heightened profile on the conference program. Even though you must submit your session to one section only, please also indicate which section might be inclined to co-sponsor. Please follow the same submission format as all AAA submissions.

 

Thea Renda Abu El-Haj
CAE President Elect and 2016 Program Chair

Donating to CAE Award Funds

In 2014, the CAE Board approved the creation of four new funds to supplement the existing endowment that provides prize money for the annual George and Louise Spindler Career Achievement Award. The Board also approved the transfer of $5,000 from its operational budget into each of the 4 new funds, for a total of $20,000.  Because the new funds were seeded in this fashion, legally they must be called “quasi-endowments.” Our fundraising goal is to raise the balance from $5,000 to at least $12,500 in each of these quasi-endowment funds; such a balance would enable a minimum payment of $500 on an annual basis. The Board hopes for a much higher balance for the SB Heath and Concha Delgado-Gaitan Funds to be able to award multiple recipients each year.

We appreciate your support in endowing these funds through donations, made at the AAA website.

Descriptions of the Awards:

The Concha Delgado Gaitan CAE Presidential Fellows Award

Concha Delgado Gaitan has been an influential mentor for many educational anthropologists.The award provides one year of mentoring to promising new scholars of educational anthropology (within 3 years after receiving the doctorate) by senior or experienced CAE scholars. Each presidential fellow is matched with a mentor for the year, beginning at the annual meeting and following through during the year. The fellows network throughout the year through social media. At the end of the term of the award, fellows and mentors meet as a group during the annual meeting to discuss career goals, research interests, and to form a professional learning community for their future careers.

The Shirley Brice Heath CAE Junior Scholar Travel Stipends

We are honored to name this many years-old stipend after our esteemed colleague Shirley Brice Heath. For many years, CAE has funded 5-7 new scholars to present at their first AAA/CAE meeting. The purpose of this endowment is to make it more financially feasible for students or other new scholars to experience the AAA/CAE meeting and broaden membership, visibility, and sustainability of CAE by including a new generation of anthropologists of education.

The Douglas Foley Early Career Award

Douglas Foley edited with great distinction the Council’s flagship scholarly journal,Anthropology & Education Quarterly and served as a willing mentor to so many of his younger colleagues. This new award acknowledges the contributions of a CAE scholar, practitioner, or organizer in the early stage of their career (4-10 years after doctoral degree).

The Frederick Erickson Outstanding Dissertation Award

This award, until now unnamed, has been given annually for many years from CAE’s general fund. By attaching the name of one of our respected elders, Frederick Erickson, we intend to raise the visibility and sustainability of the award.

Submitting to the Council of Anthropology and Education for the 2015 AAA Meeting

A NOTE FROM THE 2015 PROGRAM CHAIR

Greetings! I am reaching out on behalf of the Executive Committee to invite you to submit proposals for this year’s 114th AAA conference to be held in Denver, Colorado on November 18-22, 2015. Below you will find information regarding the conference theme, instructions on how to submit papers, panels, posters, and alternative possibilities for submission such as roundtables, public policy forums, and installations.  The theme of the conference for this year’s annual meeting is “Familiar/Strange” (see below).  You may like to use the theme as an organizing principle if appropriate, however, proposals do not need to address the theme directly if it is not pertinent to the proposal submitted.

CONFERENCE THEME: FAMILIAR/STRANGE

“Casting common sense in new light by making the familiar seem strange and the strange seem familiar is a venerable strategy used across anthropology’s subfields. It can denaturalize taken-for-granted frames and expand the horizons of students and public alike. But useful as this process of estrangement and familiarization can be, it can lapse into exoticism through “us/them” comparisons that veil historical and contemporary relations of power and powerlessness within and across societies, begging the question of the normative templates (of the “West,” of “whiteness”) that lurk behind. As an orienting theme for the 2015 Denver meeting of the AAA, we invite proposals […] (sessions, forums, special events, installations or media submissions) that press us to grapple with how and why this strategy proves both productive and obstructive, considering what it simultaneously opens up and ‘nails down.’ We particularly seek proposals that bring together and foster dialogue among subfields as we scrutinize the multiple uses and effects of this durable anthropological ‘way of knowing.”

REGISTRATION AND SUBMISSION DEADLINE

April 15th has become the annual deadline for all submissions, paper, panel, poster, retrospectives, reviews, roundtables, and installations. First, you must register for the conference (and typically renew membership) at the time of submitting your proposal, even though this does not guarantee that you will get on the program (You WILL get a refund in the event that you are not accepted to the program). Please note, however, that one does not need to be a member of CAE in order to submit to our section. Indeed, we hope that you will get colleagues involved who ordinarily might not participate in the CAE program. This goes for AAA members with primary affiliations to other sections, as well as non-AAA members, whom you can assist by applying for a membership waiver so they can participate without purchasing AAA membership (though they will still have to pay the non-member conference registration fee).

SUBMITTING WITHIN COMMITTEES

Submissions for the April 15 deadline can take multiple forms. You can submit as a member of a paper session, which is a cluster of papers organized around a particular theme, or as a part of some other collective format (see below). We highly recommend that you explore the CAE standing committee structure and connect with like-minded folks who are putting together panels or other events (There are currently 15 thematic committees). That said we also want to make it clear that committee involvement is not a prerequisite to proposing a session; it is simply a way of trying to bring people together with common interests. And if you don’t manage to connect with a group compiling a panel, you can still submit an individually volunteered paper, and have it considered for inclusion in the program. If you submit an individual paper to CAE, the program committee will attempt to group papers into panels that cohere around a particular methodological, theoretical, geographical, or conceptual theme.

INVITED SESSIONS VS. VOLUNTEER SESSION SUBMISSIONS

There are no longer early submission dates for “invited sessions”. Instead, everyone will submit by April 15th. CAE is typically allowed 2-3 invited sessions, depending on whether we are able to arrange co-sponsorships with other sections. Submissions will be reviewed and ranked following the April 15 deadline. The review rankings of the submissions will guide the CAE Executive Board to make a decision about which sessions will receive an “Invited Status”. Invited sessions are supposed to be “innovative, synthesizing sessions intended to reflect the state-of-the-art and the thematic concerns in the major subfields”. A volunteered session is a general category. A session that receives an invited status will be provided with a heightened profile on the conference program. Even though you must submit your session to one section only, please also indicate which section might be inclined to co-sponsor. Please follow the same submission format as all AAA submissions. Follow the links for call for papers on http://www.aaanet.org/meetings/Call-for-Papers.cfm. A session abstract of up to 500 words is required.  Participants are bound by the rules of the meeting and must submit final abstracts, meeting registration forms and fees via www.aaanet.org by April 15, 2015.

VOLUNTEERED SESSIONS

All sessions must be submitted online at www.aaanet.org. The organizer must select one appropriate section for review. If accepted, the volunteered session will be listed as part of the reviewing section’s program. The program committee strongly urges members to contact and work closely with section program editors and to follow the guidelines:

• The organizer is responsible for articulating the session theme and relevance in the session abstract. Each paper should reflect the session’s concept. Poorly integrated groupings are subject to revision or distribution of papers to other sessions.

• Session presentations, discussion periods and breaks must be included in the proposal at the time of submission. A maximum of 7 participants (15 minutes each) will be allotted for any single paper presentation, discussant, break, or discussion period.

• Papers within a proposed session will be evaluated individually. Organizers should be prepared for the possibility that some proposed papers may be rejected and others substituted or added.

• LCD projectors will be provided for each scholarly session on the AAA program. Laptop computers will NOT be provided. Audiovisual equipment must be operated by the participant. No changes to the original audiovisual order submitted online may be made after April 15.

• Every participant included in the proposal, including paper presenters, roundtable presenters, chairs, discussants and organizers must be registered by April 15 to appear in the official program.

• Organizers must limit proposals to one session, with a total scheduled time of 1 hour and 45 minutes (105 minutes).

• All paper or poster presentation proposals must be submitted via the AAA website.

To submit a session, go to https://aaa.confex.com/aaa/2015/sections.cgi?&usertoken=a332e5b2-6274-4980-9f4e-49f309020dee&Site=AAAweb

A session abstract of up to 500 words is required. Meeting registration forms and fees must be submitted for each participant. Submission deadline is 5:00 pm EST (10:00 pm GMT) April 15.

INDIVIDUALLY VOLUNTEERED PAPERS AND POSTERS

The program committee welcomes the submission of individual papers and posters independent from organized sessions. For evaluation purposes, the author of each individually volunteered paper and poster must select one appropriate section for the review process. To submit an individually volunteered paper or poster, go to www.aaanet.org and follow the links to the call for papers. A paper or poster abstract of up to 250 words is required. The meeting registration fee must accompany proposals. Deadline is 5:00 pm EST (10:00 pm GMT) April 15. Accepted volunteered papers and posters will be grouped by the section program editors into sessions around a common topic or theme. A maximum of 15 minutes will be allotted for each paper presentation.

RETROSPECTIVE SESSIONS

Retrospective Sessions are intended to highlight career contributions of established leading scholars (for example, on the occasion of their retirement or significant anniversary). To submit a proposal for an invited session, go to www.aaanet.org and follow the links to the call for papers. A session abstract of up to 500 words is required.  Participants are bound by the rules of the meeting and must submit final abstracts, meeting registration forms and fees via www.aaanet.org by April 15.  These sessions are highly competitive and have a higher rejection rate.  We recommend including CAE as an alternative reviewer to make sure these proposals have an opportunity to be incorporated into the CAE final program.

PUBLIC POLICY FORUMS

AAA’s public policy forums provide a place to discuss critical social issues affecting anthropology, public policy issues of interest to anthropologists, and public policy issues that could benefit from anthropological knowledge or expertise. They engage panelists (who may or may not be anthropologists) and audience members in a discussion of public policy issues to enhance the application of anthropological knowledge in society at large. Recognizing that there are diverse perspectives on panel topics, public policy forums seek to present balanced views to promote dialogue among participants. Ideally, at least one policymaker will be included in each forum. No papers are presented in public policy forums. The ideal format includes a moderator and no more than seven panelists. Following introductions, the moderator proceeds to pose questions to panelists as a group or individually. Adequate time should be set aside at the end of each forum for audience participation.

Generally, each public policy forum is scheduled for 105 minutes. Since the dual purpose of the forum is to maximize discussion of policy issues among the panelists and the audience, it is recommended the forum be structured as follows: introduction (15 minutes); moderator-posed questions and answers (60 minutes); and audience questions and comments (30 minutes).  When you complete the Session Structure Form, identify the moderator and potential panelists and note that your time allotment is 1 hour and 45 minutes. Submit an abstract of 500 words describing the public policy issue to be discussed.

To submit a public policy forum, go to www.aaanet.org and follow the links to the call for papers. In the submission area, select “public policy forum” under the session option. Refer your proposal to the AAA Committee on Public Policy for review, not a section. However, include also CAE as a secondary reviewer as these forums are also very competitive and have a higher rejection rate.  CAE reviewers may like to see this proposal in its program.

The deadline for forum submissions is 5:00 pm EST (10:00 pm GMT) April 15.

MEDIA SUBMISSIONS

As in the past, the Society for Visual Anthropology will select a jury of anthropologists and film scholars to decide which submissions to include in the festival and which among those will receive awards. SVA continues to welcome interactive media work and also encourages short work that is under 15 minutes.  DVD formats are acceptable. Submitted materials will not be returned. Please check the SVA website in early February for submission details, including additional information on preferred formats. Submission deadline is April 15. Award winners will be notified in the summer and clips of award-winning films may be placed on SVA’s website. For more information see the Society for Visual Anthropology’s website at www.societyforvisualanthropology.org.

INSTALLATIONS

Installations (a remix and rebirth of “InnoVents” and “Salons” introduced to the AAA Annual Meetings program in recent years) invite anthropological knowledge off the beaten path of the written conference paper. Like work shared in art venues,  presentations selected as part of the AAA Installations program will draw on movement, sight, sound, smell, and taste to dwell on the haptic and engage AAA  members and meeting attendees in a diverse world of the senses. Presenters may propose performances, recitals, conversations, author-meets-critic roundtables, salon reading workshops, oral history recording sessions and other alternative, creative forms of intellectual expression for consideration. Selected Installations will be curated for off-site exhibition and tied to the official AAA conference program. Successful proposals will offer attendees an opportunity to learn from a range of vested interests not typically encountered or easily found on the traditional AAA program. Installations are meant to  disrupt who and what we tend to see at the Annual Meetings, helping attendees encounter new people and to do different kinds of things at the intersections  of anthropological arts, sciences, and cultural expression.

SECTION INVITED AND VOLUNTEERED ROUNDTABLES

The roundtable provides a format to discuss critical social issues effecting anthropology. No papers are presented in this format. The organizer will submit an abstract for the roundtable but participants will not present papers or submit abstracts. A roundtable presenter is a major role, having the same weight as a paper presentation. All organizers and roundtable presenters must register.

More information can be found here: http://aaanet.org/meetings/Call-for-Papers.cfm

A NOTE ABOUT ALTERNATIVE FORMATS FOR SUBMISSION

We strongly encourage you to explore the alternative formats listed above: Public Policy Forums, Roundtables, Poster Sessions, Retrospectives, and Installations. Indeed, many of us had been commenting recently that the conventional paper session leaves us with all too little time to discuss issues in much depth. So let’s take advantage of these formats and think outside the box.

PRESENTERS’ ROLE (ONE-PLUS-ONE RULE)

Participants may only: (1) present one paper/poster, or serve as a participant on roundtable or Installation and (2) accept no more than one discussant role elsewhere on the program. An individual may serve as organizer or chair of an unlimited number of sessions. The policy of one major presentation plus one discussant role will be strictly enforced. The AAA program committee will remove any name that appears more than twice on the scholarly program and urges individuals to refrain from accepting more than one commitment of any kind in the scholarly program. A participant may be credited with co-authorship of one or more additional papers when co-authorship is understood to include participation on a research project. Presenters’ names must appear first.

April 15th is the deadline for all proposals and submissions. Follow the link for submission under the “Annual Meeting Call for Papers” and find the gray calendar table on the right hand side of the webpage http://aaanet.org/meetings/Call-for-Papers.cfm

Please let me know whether you have any question regarding the submission process.  Best always,

Marta Baltodano, CAE 2015 Program Chair

[email protected]

 

 

Many Front Doors: How to Get Involved in the Council on Anthropology of Education’s Activities

In a meeting last year, Mission Committee Co-chair Kevin Foster offered up the metaphor of ‘many doors’ to describe our goal for fostering (get it?) greater participation in CAE. The idea is that getting involved and participating in CAE can be achieved by choosing to enter some of our ‘many front doors’ rather than one imposing front door, or an insider’s “back door.”

Because we are a large national organization, most of our activities occur at the annual meetings of the American Anthropological Association. Please note that although one need not join the AAA in order to fully participate in the meetings, the conference registration rate for non-members is almost as high as it would be if one became a member and got the lower member rate. In other words, it makes little sense NOT to join if you plan to attend, because by joining you receive all sorts of other benefits, like access to job postings and journals through the Anthrosource database. When you join the AAA, you must also choose at least one of its sections, which is what we call the sub-disciplinary organizations like CAE. Please note that CAE offers an especially low student membership rate of $15, along with a $22 Associate rate for independent scholars/practitioners.

We would like to note that it is NOT imperative for you to have a formal place on the AAA program to participate in CAE activities. Perhaps you were too busy or unsure to submit a proposal for this year’s conference (and remember that the New Member Poster Session is always a gentle way to start your involvement with CAE). We know that many participants cannot receive institutional support for travel if they do not indeed have a paper or poster accepted for the program, but if you can pay your own way, you may wish to participate less formally your first time around. And if you DO submit a paper or poster, be sure to consider applying next year for our Shirley Brice Heath New CAE Scholar Travel Stipend—applications are usually due in September.

Once you get to the meetings, the first important thing to point out is that virtually all CAE events and activities on the AAA program are completely open to any registered conference participants (with the exception of the Presidential Fellows meetings—see below).  This is true of the Board Meeting (even though voting rights are limited according to constitutional by-laws), and all other special events and activities, in addition to the regular paper and roundtable sessions. It’s also true of the “Business Meeting,” which despite its stuffy-sounding name is actually a vital, celebratory space for our organization. This year we’ve changed the name to the “Business-Community Meeting,” and incorporated it into the New Member Reception. We usually have a very good time, so please come on Friday night and meet fellow CAE members, new and old!

Perhaps the most important and fruitful space for initially getting involved in CAE is the “All-Committee Meeting,” which is usually held on Friday or Saturday (this year it will be on Friday at 1 p.m.).  The 15 committees are the spaces where participants (current or prospective CAE members) get together according to their topical interests, introduce one another and share their work, and informally brainstorm ideas for paper panels or other events at the following year’s meeting. Sometimes research projects or advocacy actions blossom out of these committees as well. And if you’re not careful, you just may find yourself getting elected as a Chair or Co-Chair—we’re always looking for new blood to energize the committees.  The current list of committees can be found at: http://cae.americananthro.org/sample-page/standing-committees/. (Although capped at 15, from year to year it is possible for new committees to be formed, and old ones to be dissolved if little interest is being shown).

For graduate students and relative newcomers to CAE, there are a number of special events specifically designed to facilitate involvement. The student representatives have created 3 special events this year, each intended to foster intimate self-reflection and mentoring opportunities for some of the unique challenges of navigating today’s academic and practitioner settings. In addition, there is a Works-in-Progress session, scheduled for Friday at 9 a.m., which pairs junior scholars with senior mentors, and there are also sessions for special mentoring of our competitive selection of Presidential Fellows. We are aware, of course, that such competitions have winners and losers, and can lead to feelings of exclusion. If you were not selected as a Presidential Fellow, please take heart: We do not mean to imply that your work is any less important or distinguished, or that you are any less deserving of full participation; we still welcome your involvement across all other CAE sessions.

This year, the Mission Committee is sponsoring a “Town Hall” session, on Thursday at 1 p.m., to evaluate our progress toward our stated goals of promoting social justice, as well as to discuss, debate, and possibly revise the mission statement itself. This would be an excellent opportunity to experience the “culture” of CAE and have your voice heard.

In closing, we pride ourselves on being a transparent, democratic, and inclusive organization, but we also know that we can always do a better job. If you have questions or concerns about our practices or activities, please bring them to the attention of anyone serving on the Board, which includes all officers and committee chairs. These concerns will get communicated to the Executive Committee for consideration.

 

 

 

 

Anthropology and Education Quarterly Call for Papers – Ethnographic Short Fiction, Poetry and Creative Non-Fiction

Anthropology and Education Quarterly (AEQ) is seeking ethnographic short fiction, poetry and creative non-fiction for a new creative section of the journal focused on alternative productions and representations of anthropological work in education.

The field of anthropology is rooted in the search for multiple truths. Stories (Bell, 2003; Solinger, Fox, & Irani, 2008; Yosso, 2006) and poems (Maynard & Cahmann-Taylor, 2010) provide avenues for scholars to make sense of their findings, honor the traditions and experiences of marginalized communities, explore the tensions of researcher positionality, and trouble the authority of knowledge(s) and its representations. Furthermore, creative approaches to anthropological production can open the otherwise closed space of the academy, communicating findings in ways that provoke both thought and action among the wider public.

Submissions should draw on rich, rigorously collected ethnographic data. Additionally, they should represent high literary quality. Short fiction and creative non-fiction should be no longer than 5000 words, and poetry should be limited to 1-3 poems. Please include biographical information in a separate cover letter so that the work itself remains blind for review. Please submit to [email protected] Submissions will be considered on a rolling basis, and will be accepted or rejected but will not receive reviewer comments.